*** Co-Creation in Process ***

This site is being co-created with RAPID Alliance Community Members, the RAPID Alliance / STAR Study Team in the National Science Foundation Center for Health Organization Transformation

RAPID Alliance2.0

A research-driven collaborative designed to optimize medication use in the US, improve health and wellbeing for millions of people, save up to $528 billion dollars per year, and generate billions in new economic value from 2022 - 2031

See RAPID Alliance Strategic Framework 2022 - 2031 for details


The RAPID Alliance is an Action Research Project in the RAPID Alliance / STAR Study in the National Science Foundation Center for Health Organization Transformation at the University of Louisville in Collaboration with the Frazier Polypharmacy Program at the University of Louisville.


Call to Action

Please join us in an all stakeholder effort to address one of the most significant health challenges in the US today - non-optimized use of medications. We will be using service ecosystem design science to solve this problem in ways that have never before been possible.

Judah Thornewill, PhD

Principal Investigator

RAPID Alliance / STAR Study, NSF CHOT, UofL
Assistant Professor and Executive in Residence, University of Louisville, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, Department of Health Management and Systems Science. Investigator with NSF CHOT at UofL.

Demetra Antimisiaris, PharmD, BCGP, FASCP

Co-Principal Investigator

RAPID Alliance / STAR Study, NSF CHOT, UofLAssociate Professor, Director, University of Louisville Frazier Polypharmacy and Medication Management Program, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, Department of Health Management and Systems Sciences, Investigator, NSF CHOT at UofL.

Tom Walton, MDiv, MS

Co-Investigator


Seasoned population health and health operations executive (Catholic Health Initiatives, Kentucky One, University of Louisville Hospital, Humana. Executive in residence, University of Louisville, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, Department of Health Management and Systems Science.

Robert Esterhay, MD

Co-Investigator

RAPID Alliance / STAR Study, NSF CHOT, UofLAssociate Professor and Chair Emeritus, University of Louisville, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, Department of Health Management and Systems Sciences. Investigator, NSF CHOT at UofL. Health and population health informatics.

William Yasnoff, MD, PhD, FACMI

Co-Coordinator, RAPID Alliance

Co-Investigator

RAPID Alliance / STAR Study, NSF CHOT, UofLAdjunct Professor, Health Sciences Informatics, Johns Hopkins University; Managing Partner, National Health Information Infrastructure (NHII) Advisors; Former Senior Advisor, NHII, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services; Former Member, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, National Academy of Medicine.

The RAPID Alliance Action Research Network

Forty-Two Universities. Twelve National Associations. Other Leading Organization and Groups.

Problem

The problem the RAPID Alliance is addressing is non-optimized medications use. In the US alone, millions of people each year face avoidable illnesses or death caused by non-optimized use of medications, vaccines and related therapies. This situation costs an estimated $528 billion in annual spending on likely avoidable hospitalizations, emergencies and physician visits. Billions of dollars of public and private sector investment sidelined because of high levels of fragmentation and complex regulatory challenges.

Non-optimized use of medications and vaccines is one of the most significant public health challenges in the US today. Each week in the US, errors, misuse, overuse, underuse, abuse and non-adherence are estimated to cause 5,400 deaths, 240,000 hospitalizations, 460,000 emergency room visits, 3.2 million physician visits, and $10 billion in likely avoidable medical bills. The opioid crisis has, in part, been fueled by this problem. All of this is happening while billions of dollars of public and private sector investment sits on the sidelines because of high levels of fragmentation and complex regulatory challenges.

Desired Outcomes

The desired outcomes of the RAPID Alliance are to improve US health and wellbeing measures for millions of people by reducing adverse events caused by adverse drug events, prescription medication abuse, non-adherence, lack of access, vaccine hesitancy, and other non-optimized use of medications, vaccines and related therapies. We also measurably reduce health spending caused by non-optimized medication use, and increase investments in innovative solutions.

Approach

To achieve these outcomes, the RAPID Alliance is using an emerging area of science called service ecosystem design science. This area of science supports ways of addressing this problem through large-scale collaboration in ways that have not, until now, been possible. The RAPID Alliance ecosystem collaborative approach focuses on engaging key stakeholders, from both public and private sectors, in co-creating solutions no one group can achieve on their own.

Action Roadmap

RAPID Alliance work is guided by our Action Roadmap. As shown, work on the RAPID Alliance ecosystem collaborative began in March, 2020, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Start up funding was provided through the National Science Foundation Center for Health Organization Transformation at the University of Louisville, and Sanofi, a leading pharmaceutical firm. A systematic landscape review was conducted and high level action agenda developed. The findings were published in a peer reviewed journal in November, 2021, and a strategic framework published here. We are now organizing funding to support a nationwide 10 year implementation plan to solve this problem at national scale.

Thank You

Thank you to founding partners, and catalysts of the RAPID Alliance include leading national pharmacist and pharmacy sector associations, leading companies, and our university research partners.

Founding Strategic Action Partners

Founding Initiative Sponsors

Thank you to our Practice Council members for their vision of co-creating a national research infrastructure designed to support strategic action with potential to make a transformational difference. Thank you to selected Research Council members for guidance to help strengthen the study design.

Research Infrastructure Support